How Advocacy Advances Your Mission and Raises You Money, and the

Steps You Need to Take to Have the Most Impact

 

intersection

Learn how connecting your organization’s mission and goals to effective public advocacy can multiply your effectiveness and increase fundraising success, and how you can make your organization more impactful and sustainable:

Politics and Policy:

Making the Connection

Members of an honorary society faced difficult financial challenges due to dramatic changes in their craft. They needed help learning how to handle public policy issues affecting their artistry. This ability improved services the society could provide to its membership. Result: measurable boost in renewal rates and dues revenues.
If you are an association that needs to boost membership, contact Larry Kaplan to learn how you can provide critical information to your members on public policy and government regulations.

Building New Partnerships

An education non-profit that mentors inner-city, low-income high school youth knew it could be even more effective, but it needed a better partnership with the local school district. By retaining public affairs expertise, they were able to reach out to school district officials, change needed policies, and become even more impactful — and that impressed their contributors.
If you’re an organization that could improve your effectiveness by helping the government agencies you work with to improve, contact Larry Kaplan.

Improving Your Message:

Creating Compelling Communications

A small state agency needed help with grant writing. They knew their material and could deliver on their promises, but ineffective communications caused them to lose out on opportunities. With an accomplished communicator, they were able to demonstrate their effectiveness and gain grant funding.
If you need help telling your story —in grant applications, brochures, and collateral materials — contact Larry Kaplan.

Advocating in Service to Your Mission

An established social service provider realized that if it wanted to more effectively serve its clients, it had to seek systemic change on their behalf.  So they conducted a strategic planning exercize to figure out how to best integrate advocacy with mission delivery, and then implemented it. 
If you would like to launch an advocacy program, but don’t quite know where to begin, contact Larry Kaplan.

Engaging the Community:

Breaking Through Red Tape

A health clinic wanted to renovate its building and expand its hours of service, but the neighborhood objected to increased traffic and parking. Because the clinic did not engage the community first, City Hall would not grant it building permits until they resolved their issues with their neighbors. They hired a community relations consultant, addressed the neighborhood’s concerns, were granted their permits and grew — improving service to the community.
If you need help cutting through government red tape because you lack local community support, call Larry Kaplan.

Creating Systemic Change

A group of community environmental groups wanted their city to improve conservation efforts, so they formed a coalition and engaged expert help to advance their agenda with elected officials and agency staff. Result: greater bang for their buck and real changes in the city’s environmental policy.
If you need a strategy to create the systemic change that will serve your clients and inspire your donors, or if you are a grantmaker who understands that systemic change will increase the impact of your investments, contact Larry Kaplan.

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